Panchatantra-Stories Suchimukha and The Monkey
  1. Panchatantra Tales Introduction
  2. First Strategy – The Loss of Friends
  3. The Monkey And The Wedge
  4. The Jackal And The Drum
  5. The Fall And Rise Of A Merchant
  6. The Foolish Sage And The Jackal
  7. The Crafty Crane And The Craftier Crab
  8. The Cunning Hare and The Witless Lion
  9. The Bug and The Poor Flea
  10. The Story of The Blue Jackal
  11. The Camel, The Jackal And The Crow
  12. The Bird Pair and The Sea
  13. Tale of The Three Fish
  14. The Elephant and The Sparrow
  15. The Lion and The Jackal
  16. Suchimukha and The Monkey
  17. How a Sparrow Came to Grief
  18. The Foolish Crane and The Mongoose
  19. The King and The Foolish Monkey
  20. Second Strategy – Gaining Friends
  21. The Crow-Rat Discourse – Panchatantra Tales
  22. Meeting a New Friend – Panchatantra Tales
  23. The Hermit and The Mouse – Panchatantra Tales
  24. Shandili and Sesame Seeds
  25. Story of The Merchant’s Son
  26. The Unlucky Weaver
  27. The Rescue of a Deer
  28. Third Strategy: Of Crows And Owls
  29. Elephants and Hares
  30. The Cunning Mediator
  31. The Brahmin and The Crooks
  32. The Brahmin and The Cobra
  33. The Old Man, His Young Wife and The Thief
  34. The Tale of Two Snakes
  35. The Wedding of The Mouse
  36. Tale of The Golden Droppings
  37. Frogs That Rode a Snake
  38. The Croc and The Monkey
  39. The Lion and The Foolish Donkey
  40. The Story of The Potter
  41. A Three-in-One Story
  42. The Carpenter’s Wife
  43. The Price of Indiscretion
  44. The Jackal’s Strategy
  45. Fifth Strategy – Imprudence
  46. The Brahmani and The Mongoose
  47. The Lion That Sprang to Life
  48. The Tale of Two Fish and a Frog
  49. The Story of The Weaver
  50. The Miserly Father
  51. Tale Of The Bird With Two Heads
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Moral: Never give advice unless you are asked for it.

A gang of monkeys made their home in a mountain slope. When winter came, it brought not only severe cold but also heavy rains. Unable to stand the cold, the monkeys collected red berries wildly growing in the mountain slope. They gathered around the berries and began blowing air at them thinking they were embers.

bird-and-monkeys-panchatantra-tales-image1 Suchimukha and The Monkey

Watching their vain effort in amusement, Suchimukha, a bird, told them, “You fool, they are not embers but red berries. Why do you waste your energy on them? This will not save you from cold. Go and look for a shelter in a cave or a place free from wind. The clouds are thick and there will be no immediate relief from rain.”

An old member of the monkey gang angrily told the bird, “Why do you poke your nose in our affairs? Go away. Haven’t the elders said that he who cherishes his welfare should not talk to a gambler or an inefficient workman. So is the person a fool who talks to an idiot or a pleasure seeker.”

Disregarding the old monkey’s anger and not giving room to any other monkey to talk, Suchimukha went on repeating his advice to them to seek shelter elsewhere. Tired with the bird’s unwanted advice, one of the monkeys sprang at the bird and bashed him against a rock till he was dead.

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bird-and-monkeys-panchatantra-tales-image2 Suchimukha and The Monkey

Karataka said at the end of the story, “If you counsel a fool it will only provoke him and not pacify. If you feed milk to a snake it will increase its store of poison. That’s why you should not offer advice to everyone. Look, how two good sparrows lost their home, all due to a foolish monkey.”

At Damanaka’s request, Karataka began telling the story of the evil monkey.


Suchimukha and The Monkey – Panchatantra Tales by Vishnu Sharma

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