Panchatantra-Stories The Bug and The Poor Flea
  1. Panchatantra Tales Introduction
  2. First Strategy – The Loss of Friends
  3. The Monkey And The Wedge
  4. The Jackal And The Drum
  5. The Fall And Rise Of A Merchant
  6. The Foolish Sage And The Jackal
  7. The Crafty Crane And The Craftier Crab
  8. The Cunning Hare and The Witless Lion
  9. The Bug and The Poor Flea
  10. The Story of The Blue Jackal
  11. The Camel, The Jackal And The Crow
  12. The Bird Pair and The Sea
  13. Tale of The Three Fish
  14. The Elephant and The Sparrow
  15. The Lion and The Jackal
  16. Suchimukha and The Monkey
  17. How a Sparrow Came to Grief
  18. The Foolish Crane and The Mongoose
  19. The King and The Foolish Monkey
  20. Second Strategy – Gaining Friends
  21. The Crow-Rat Discourse – Panchatantra Tales
  22. Meeting a New Friend – Panchatantra Tales
  23. The Hermit and The Mouse – Panchatantra Tales
  24. Shandili and Sesame Seeds
  25. Story of The Merchant’s Son
  26. The Unlucky Weaver
  27. The Rescue of a Deer
  28. Third Strategy: Of Crows And Owls
  29. Elephants and Hares
  30. The Cunning Mediator
  31. The Brahmin and The Crooks
  32. The Brahmin and The Cobra
  33. The Old Man, His Young Wife and The Thief
  34. The Tale of Two Snakes
  35. The Wedding of The Mouse
  36. Tale of The Golden Droppings
  37. Frogs That Rode a Snake
  38. The Croc and The Monkey
  39. The Lion and The Foolish Donkey
  40. The Story of The Potter
  41. A Three-in-One Story
  42. The Carpenter’s Wife
  43. The Price of Indiscretion
  44. The Jackal’s Strategy
  45. Fifth Strategy – Imprudence
  46. The Brahmani and The Mongoose
  47. The Lion That Sprang to Life
  48. The Tale of Two Fish and a Frog
  49. The Story of The Weaver
  50. The Miserly Father
  51. Tale Of The Bird With Two Heads
The Two Asses
Two asses tracking, t'other day,Of which each in his turn,Did incense to the other bur ...
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Moral: The false promises of friends as well as strangers have no value. You end up paying for it.

Once upon a time a bug named Mandavisarpini made for itself a small home in the folds of the milk-white sheets of linen spread on the king’s ornamental bed. One day, the bug saw a flea drifting into the king’s bedroom and told the flea that he had come to a wrong place and asked him to leave before somebody noticed him.

The flea, whose name was Agnimukha, said, “Oh venerable sir, it is not proper for you to ask a guest to leave even if he is a wicked person. You must welcome him, ask him about his health, say words that comfort him and request him to take rest. That is how good hosts treat their guests. Besides, I have tasted the blood of a variety of men and animals. Never did I taste royal blood. The king’s blood is a compound of rich foods and is bound to taste rich. Please permit me to relish this delicacy.”

The flea continued, “Everything we do in this world we do to slake our hunger. I have come to you in search of food. It is not proper for you to siphon off the king’s blood all alone. You should share it with me also.”

The Dog in the Manger
A Dog looking out for its afternoon nap jumped into the Manger of an Ox and lay there cosi ...

The bug told him, “oh, flea, I suck the blood of the king when he is fast asleep. You are impatient. You have to wait till I finish my job. After me, you can have your fill.” The flea agreed.

bug-poor-flea-panchatantra-tales-shortstoriescoin-image The Bug and The Poor Flea

Meanwhile, the king entered his bedroom to sleep. But the impatient flea began feasting on the king’s blood even before he went to sleep. Stung by his bite, the king rose from his bed and asked his servants to look for what was in the bed that caused him discomfort. The king’s men pulled the linen off the bed and examined it closely. Before they could him, the flea sneaked into a recess of the bed. The servants found the poor bug and killed him at once.

Damanaka told Pingalaka, “This is why you should kill Sanjeevaka before he could kill you. He who abandons a trusted confidant and trusts an outsider will die like sage Kakudruma.”

“How did he die?” Pinagalaka asked him.


The Bug and The Poor Flea – Panchatantra Tales by Vishnu Sharma

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