Panchatantra-Stories The Crow-Rat Discourse - Panchatantra Tales
  1. Panchatantra Tales Introduction
  2. First Strategy – The Loss of Friends
  3. The Monkey And The Wedge
  4. The Jackal And The Drum
  5. The Fall And Rise Of A Merchant
  6. The Foolish Sage And The Jackal
  7. The Crafty Crane And The Craftier Crab
  8. The Cunning Hare and The Witless Lion
  9. The Bug and The Poor Flea
  10. The Story of The Blue Jackal
  11. The Camel, The Jackal And The Crow
  12. The Bird Pair and The Sea
  13. Tale of The Three Fish
  14. The Elephant and The Sparrow
  15. The Lion and The Jackal
  16. Suchimukha and The Monkey
  17. How a Sparrow Came to Grief
  18. The Foolish Crane and The Mongoose
  19. The King and The Foolish Monkey
  20. Second Strategy – Gaining Friends
  21. The Crow-Rat Discourse – Panchatantra Tales
  22. Meeting a New Friend – Panchatantra Tales
  23. The Hermit and The Mouse – Panchatantra Tales
  24. Shandili and Sesame Seeds
  25. Story of The Merchant’s Son
  26. The Unlucky Weaver
  27. The Rescue of a Deer
  28. Third Strategy: Of Crows And Owls
  29. Elephants and Hares
  30. The Cunning Mediator
  31. The Brahmin and The Crooks
  32. The Brahmin and The Cobra
  33. The Old Man, His Young Wife and The Thief
  34. The Tale of Two Snakes
  35. The Wedding of The Mouse
  36. Tale of The Golden Droppings
  37. Frogs That Rode a Snake
  38. The Croc and The Monkey
  39. The Lion and The Foolish Donkey
  40. The Story of The Potter
  41. A Three-in-One Story
  42. The Carpenter’s Wife
  43. The Price of Indiscretion
  44. The Jackal’s Strategy
  45. Fifth Strategy – Imprudence
  46. The Brahmani and The Mongoose
  47. The Lion That Sprang to Life
  48. The Tale of Two Fish and a Frog
  49. The Story of The Weaver
  50. The Miserly Father
  51. Tale Of The Bird With Two Heads
The Gods Wishing to Instruct a Son of Jupiter
For Monseigneur The Duke Du Maine.To Jupiter was born a son,Who, conscious of his orig ...
0 views today | 4 total views | 679 words | 3.57 pages | read in 4 mins

After he saw how Hiranyaka had helped Chitragriva, Lagupatanaka came down from his tree perch and called out the rat in a voice resembling that of Chitragriva. The rat thought, “What happened? Did I forget to free any bird? The dove king must be calling me for the same purpose.”

Not sure who was calling him, the rat shouted from inside his fort, “Who are you?”

“I am Laghupatanaka, the crow.”

The rat further retreated into his fort and said, “Go away at once, I don’t know who you are.”

“I have come on an important business. Why don’t you meet me?”

“What do I gain by meeting you?”

“Sir, I have seen you liberating Chitragriva and his retinue. I thought friendship with you would be useful in such a crisis. I am seeking your hand.”

“Very odd! You are the diner and I am the dinner. How can there be amity between the two? Where there is enmity, there cannot be friendship. Didn’t you hear the elders say:

Friendship or marriage is always
between equals in caste and wealth.
There cannot be any sort of bond
between the weak and the strong.

“He who seeks friendship with someone who is not an equal will earn ridicule. So, please go.”

The crow replied, “Hiranyaka, I am waiting here at your doorstep. If you reject my hand, I will starve here to death.”

“But friendship with you is not possible. However hot the water, it still kills the fire.”

“We haven’t even seen each other. How can there be enmity between both of us?”

The Pack of Ragamuffins
The cock once said to the hen, it is now the time when the nuts are ripe, so let us go to ...

Hiranyaka then explained, “Enmity is of two kinds. The first is natural and the second is artificial. The second kind disappears when what caused it disappears. But natural enmity ends only with the death of one of the two enemies.”

“Can you make it clearer”, asked Laghupatanaka.

“Yes, artificial enmity is always based on some reason. Natural enmity is like the one between a snake and a mongoose, water and fire, Devatas and Rakshasas, dogs and cats, the rich and the poor, the learned and the illiterate, between women of virtue and vice.”

The crow then pleaded, “Sir, what you say is unreasonable. There is always a reason behind friendship and enmity. That is why a wise man should always seek friendship and not enmity.”

“True, it is foolish to think that you will not come to harm because you are a man of character. People who are blinded by ignorance and anger do not consider your character,” said the rat.

“Friendship with bad men is like a pot of clay easy to break but difficult to rejoin. With good men it is like pot of gold, difficult to break but easy to mend. I pledge that you will have no reason to fear danger from me,” said the crow.

Hiranyaka said, “I have no faith in pledges. don’t trust an enemy with whom you have made peace. Even if the hole is small, water seeping through it can sink a ship.

Don’t trust a person untrustworthy
Faith has its own limits
The evil that trust brings
Leaves you totally destroyed
Him who is highly skeptical
The mighty cannot put an end to
Him who trusts others easily
Even the weakest can kill.

The Stingy Artist
Gessen was an artist monk. Before he would start a drawing or painting he always insisted ...

mouse-and-crow-panchatantra-tales-image1 The Crow-Rat Discourse - Panchatantra Tales

After this long sermon, Laghupatanaka didn’t know how to reply. Hiranyaka, he thought, was a very knowledgeable being and that was a strong reason for him to seek his friendship. Turning to the rat, he said, “Seven words are enough to bring two good people together. We have already talked a lot, which makes us good friends. That’s why please believe what I say. If it is not possible, I will stay out and you can talk to me from within your stronghold.”

Impressed by his sincerity, Hiranyaka said, “Okay, you should not step inside my fort.” When Laghupatanaka agreed to that condition, the two became friends and enjoyed their daily meetings and long talks. They helped each other, the crow bringing pieces of meat and relics of offerings to God at temples for the rat and the rat in turn bringing for Hiranyaka grains of paddy and food items. Thus they became great and inseparable friends.


The Crow-Rat Discourse – Panchatantra Tales by Vishnu Sharma

Disclaimer: All the stories, poems and images used on this website, unless otherwise noted are assumed to be in the public domain. If you feel your image or story or poem should not be here, please email us to [email protected] and it will be promptly removed.
Note: We do not use any of our content for commercial purpose.