Aesop’s Fables

Aesop

Aesop

Aesop's Fables

Aesop’s Fables

Aesop’s Fables and Short Stories

About: Aesop (c. 620–564 BCE) was an Ancient Greek fabulist or story teller credited with a number of fables now collectively known as Aesop’s Fables. Although his existence remains uncertain and (if they ever existed) no writings by him survive, numerous tales credited to him were gathered across the centuries and in many languages in a storytelling tradition that continues to this day. Many of the tales are characterized by animals and inanimate objects that speak, solve problems, and generally have human characteristics.

Scattered details of Aesop’s life can be found in ancient sources, including Aristotle, Herodotus, and Plutarch. An ancient literary work called The Aesop Romance tells an episodic, probably highly fictional version of his life, including the traditional description of him as a strikingly ugly slave who by his cleverness acquires freedom and becomes an adviser to kings and city-states. Older spellings of his name have included Esop(e) and Isope. A later tradition (dating from the Middle Ages) depicts Aesop as a black Ethiopian. Depictions of Aesop in popular culture over the last 2500 years have included several works of art and his appearance as a character in numerous books, films, plays, and television programs. More…

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The Lion and the Three Bulls

Moral: Union is strength. Three Bulls for a long time pastured together. A Lion lay in ambush in the hope of making them his prey, but was afraid to attack them while they kept together.

The Dogs and the Fox

Moral: It is easy to kick a man that is down. Some Dogs, finding the skin of a lion, began to tear it in pieces with their teeth. A Fox, seeing them, said, "If this lion were alive, you would soon find out that his claws were stronger than your teeth."

The Lark Burying Her Father

Moral: Youth's first duty is reverence to parents. The Lark (according to an ancient legend) was created before the earth itself, and when her father died, as there was no earth, she could find no place of burial for him.

The Cat and Venus

Moral: Nature exceeds nurture. A Cat fell in love with a handsome young man, and entreated Venus to change her into the form of a woman. Venus consented to her request and transformed her into a beautiful damsel, so that the youth saw her and loved her, and took her home as his bride.

The King’s Son and the Painted Lion

Moral: We had better bear our troubles bravely than try to escape them. A King, whose only son was fond of martial exercises, had a dream in which he was warned that his son would be killed by a lion.
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